Why Catholics Should Vote for Trump

November 7, 2016

Sunday Masses across the country found most parishioners not getting any pastoral advice on how to vote with a properly formed conscience. In the Archdiocese of Boston, parishioners heard or saw a letter from the Vicar General on why we should vote “No” on the question of whether to legalize marijuana in the commonwealth, but not a peep about how to even think about the choices for major elective office, including pro-abortion politicians who could damage society for generations by appointing pro-abortion judges to the Supreme Court!  Is that cowardice on the part of bishops like Cardinal O’Malley, or willful negligence?  Either explanation is BAD.

For those who have friends or family members still on the fence about whether they will vote at all, or not sure who to vote for, we are pleased to share this excellent video homily, which we think you should share with every Catholic you know.  It’s called, “Catholics Forbidden to Vote Hillary” but it also answers the important question, “Could or should Catholics Vote for Donald Trump.”  The answer is a resounding, YES!

The video runs about 13 minutes.  In case you don’t have time to watch the whole thing, here are a few excerpts:

In the last debate, this is the first time in any presidential election that there is a major candidate who aggressively insisted they would advocate abortion in most extreme circumstances.  Hillary Clinton advocates and will aggressively pursue abortion of children up to and including the time of birth–as a child is about to be born into this world, that its life can be snuffed out in the birth canal. What a monstrous position!  It is nothing short of diabolical. It is a demonic position.  And for the first time in history, we have someone who would be president arguing and insisting on this practice.

On the other hand in that same debate, in the first time in history of presidential elections in the U.S., we had a candidate who openly and aggressively insisted that he would do what he could to roll back the Supreme Court decision to legalize abortion (Roe v Wade) and he would appoint solidly pro-life candidates to the Supreme Court.

What a contrast on this single most important political issue that we face at this time!

So, can someone in good conscience, can a Catholic in good conscience vote for Hillary Clinton?  Absolutely not!  There is not enough money in this world to buy my vote for her, and not enough tortures on the face of the earth to force me to vote for anyone who advocates the positions that Hillary Clinton holds fast to.

Can a Catholic in good conscience vote for Trump, or should a Catholic vote for Trump?

Mr. Alan Keyes, former ambassador and presidential candidate, took the position in a recent local debate that as a Catholic, we should all will the reign of Christ the King on earth.  I agree. In first lesson of this Mass, St. Paul tells us that our citizenship is in heaven, and we await the fullness of His kingdom. We should will — even now in Christ’s absence on earth — that the reign of Christ be found here and now on earth.  Christ’s Church should advance as the one true religion on earth.

That means that ideally our elected and appointed officials should not just tolerate the Catholic Church but do whatever in their power to support the Catholic religion. Of course, under present circumstances and even circumstances of decades past, that ideal hasn’t been possible.  Is it feasible, practical , and possible we can elect candidates who will do precisely that?  The fact is that while we have had a few candidates over the decades, we’re never had that as a President. Even the “Catholic” JFK made clear from the get-go that no one from the Catholic Church would guide his presidential decisions.

Fact is, while we want the will of Christ to the maximum, practically speaking, the reality is is we don’t have candidates who share that vision.

So, may we vote for someone who may not fully share that vision? The answer is YES, certainly!

Does Trump fall within those individuals on the ballot for whom a good Catholic in good conscience could or should cast their vote?  The answer is YES.  Answer is yes.  Can a good Catholic vote for Trump?  Yes.  Should a good Catholic vote for Trump?  Yes.

Given his stated position on protection of unborn and right to life and given the position of his main opponent, Hillary Clinton, who advocates murder of children even as they are being born, YES, Trump is a moral choice.

It is not a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils. Catholic simply may not choose someone who is evil.  In this case, we have the principle of double-effect.  Trump may not be many of your 1st choice candidates, or 2nd or 3rd or 5th or 50th. But we have what we have, and there are only 2 candidates who can feasibly  win this election—Trump and Clinton.

Donald Trump is a moral choice—for what he stands for on the life of the unborn.  On other matters on which people could disagree—personal choices, personal behavior—those are covered in the double effect. We would seek to elect him, cast our vote for him, not because we support or endorse his personal flaws and failing, or even some lesser issues we might not agree with.  In casting a vote for him, the primary effect we seek is a good one: it is for the good he has promised, namely scaling back the murder of children by abortion, and it is to preclude a woman who holds a demonic position regarding unborn children from getting to the  highest office in the U.S.

Mr. Ferrara in that same discussion even went so far as to say it might be a moral imperative to vote for Donald Trump, given the alternative. He cites the comparison going back decades into the last century, when Pope Pius XII insisted, in order to slow the spread of Communism,  that Catholics given the opportunity to vote were morally obliged to vote for candidates who would oppose the spread of Godless communism, even acknowledging those candidates might be flawed and imperfect, but morally acceptable.

“The exercise of the right to vote is an act of grave responsibility…” Pope Pius XII 1946 AAS 38, 187. When there was a threat to the Church in Italy through the Communist party in 1948, Pope Pius XII said, “That in the present circumstances it is strictly obligatory for whoever has the right, man or woman, to take part in the elections. He who abstains, particularly through indolence or from cowardice, thereby commits a grave sin, a mortal offense.” AAS 40, 119

So can and should a Roman Catholic vote for Donald Trump in the upcoming election? The answer is YES.  Absolutely!  And I intend to cast my vote for him.

*       *      *      *

Two more thoughts from BCI here.  St. John Paul II said, “The promotion of the culture of life should be the highest priority in our societies…If the right to life is not defended decisively as a condition for all other rights of the person, all other references to human rights remain deceitful and illusory.” Denver Archbishop Samuel Aquila recently said, “..the direct killing of innocent human life must be opposed at all times by every follower of Jesus Christ. There are no legitimate exceptions to this teaching.”  Then there is the clear threat to religious freedom for all of us with a Clinton presidency.

Pope Pius XI in an encyclical to Mexico in 1937 said: “Thus a Catholic will take care not to pass over his right to vote when the good of the Church or of the country requires it.” Firmissimam constantiam, March 28, 1937, AAS 29, 189.

If you’re a faithful Catholic, you can’t sit this one out. You must vote for the one viable candidate, Trump, who has promised to scale back the evil of abortion and prevent the diabolical destruction promised by Clinton if she gets into office. Feel free to share this anywhere you wish.


Election 2012 Outcome: Religion was a Factor

November 7, 2012

Watching the election results last night was very painful.

The one piece of consolation for BCI in the results was that in Massachusetts, we managed to defeat Question 2, physician-assisted suicide — 51% voted no vs 49% who voted yes. Praise God for that triumph over evil. Kudos to all who worked to defeat it, including Cardinal O’Malley and the team from the archdiocese.  BCI spoke to and heard from people working to oppose the measure in recent weeks, and found it troubling that the compelling moral arguments against physician-assisted suicide worked less well in persuading people to oppose it vs talking about how the law was flawed in its wording.  Still, we are very glad it was defeated, and we hope it does not come back again.

On a local level, we were very disappointed to see pro-abort candidates Elizabeth Warren and Joe Kennedy III win.

Of course, the worse outcome was seeing the most pro-abortion President in our nation’s history get re-elected, and seeing how voters who consider themselves Catholic helped that victory.

Catholics represent more than a quarter of the electorate. According to this Politico article, and this one from the Catholic Sentinel, Obama won Catholic voters 50 percent to 47 percent, though Catholics who attend Mass weekly seem to have favored Romney.  Obama also won 70 percent of the Jewish vote, down from 78 percent in 2008.  Romney carried Protestant voters by a 13-point margin, 56 percent to 43 percent. Here’s more from the Huffington Post:

Obama carried Electoral College votes in several battleground states where religious voters were key parts of the electorate, including Catholic-heavy Ohio, evangelical-heavy Iowa, and Virignia. Another swing stage with a large population of religious voters, Florida, was too close to call by early Wednesday morning.

Initial exit polls — which are expected to change through Wednesday as more results come in — showed a mix bag of support for Obama and Romney among religious voters. Among people who said they attend religious services weekly, for example, exit polls indicated Romney took a significant lead. But among voters who said they attend services “occasionally” or “never,” Obama had large leads.

Early exit poll results also showed Obama losing the overall white evangelical vote to Romney, but winning the overall Catholic vote by just a few points. Among Jewish voters, initial exit polls showed Obama having an overwhelming lead over Romney, but preliminary results also showed him winning a smaller percentage of the Jewish vote than he did four years ago.

And in Maryland and Maine, early reports indicated that ballot initatives that would legalize same-sex marriage — efforts that were strongly opposed by conservative pastors — would pass.

Not good. Religion aside,  Jeff Jacoby, writing in the Boston Globe summarized the Obama victory in this way:

Obama may have eked out a victory, but he won it ugly, and his first term will go down as one of the great squandered boons in American political history. Rarely has a president come to office with such a reservoir of goodwill; rarely has any done so much to poison it. To cling to office, he spent a vast fortune trashing his opponent — a ferocious campaign that epitomized everything he once claimed to oppose.

The last four years changed Obama from the face of “hope and change” to the candidate of “whatever it takes.” What will the next four years bring?

Alas, despite the bad news, we pick ourselves up and carry on.  Much remains in this battle.  A Post-Election 2012 Webcast featuring Fr. Frank Pavone of Priests for Life will take place tonight from 9-10pm and should be a very worthwhile listen. We can also especially take comfort in the scripture readings for today.

From Philippians 2: 12-18, we hear:

My beloved, obedient as you have always been, not only when I am present but all the more now when I am absent, work out your salvation with fear and trembling.
For God is the one who, for his good purpose, works in you both to desire and to work. Do everything without grumbling or questioning, that you may be blameless and innocent,
children of God without blemish in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, among whom you shine like lights in the world, as you hold on to the word of life,
so that my boast for the day of Christ may be that I did not run in vain or labor in vain.

In Psalm 27, we hear:

R. The Lord is my light and my salvation.
The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom should I fear? The LORD is my life’s refuge; of whom should I be afraid?One thing I ask of the LORD; this I seek: To dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, That I may gaze on the loveliness of the LORD and contemplate his temple.I believe that I shall see the bounty of the LORD, in the land of the living. Wait for the LORD with courage; be stouthearted, and wait for the LORD.

The Gospel, Luke 14:25-33 says:

“Whoever does not carry his own cross and come after me cannot be my disciple.”

So keep praying, hold onto the Word of God, wait for the Lord with courage, but remember at the same time, we all have to carry our own crosses and follow Christ.

We close today by repeating this Election Prayer to Mary, which is even more meaningful today:

O Most Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of Mercy, at this most critical time, we entrust the United States of America to your loving care.
Most Holy Mother, we beg you to reclaim this land for the glory of your Son. Overwhelmed with the burden of the sins of our nation, we cry to you from the depths of our hearts and seek refuge in your motherly protection.
Look down with mercy upon us and touch the hearts of our people. Open our minds to the great worth of human life and to the responsibilities that accompany human freedom.
Free us from the falsehoods that lead to the evil of abortion and threaten the sanctity of family life. Grant our country the wisdom to proclaim that God’s law is the foundation on which this nation was founded, and that He alone is the True Source of our cherished rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
O Merciful Mother, give us the courage to reject the culture of death and the strength to build a new Culture of Life.


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