In Memoriam: Bishop John D’Arcy

Bishop Emeritus of South Bend Indiana and former Boston auxiliary bishop John D’Arcy passed into eternal rest on Sunday morning. BCI was saddened to hear of his passing and we pray for the repose of his soul.

This blog post could have also been titled, “What Cardinal O’Malley and all bishops can learn from Bishop John D’Arcy.” For those not familiar to him, we offer a few excerpts from articles as a tribute to his pastoral leadership–in both the sexual abuse crisis but also defense of the faith at Notre Dame and in the public square.

LifeSite News said:

Bishop John M. D’Arcy, best known in recent years for leading an unprecedented wave of episcopal opposition against the University of Notre Dame’s 2009 honorary doctorate to President Obama, has passed away.

The bishop died Sunday, February 3, at the age of 80 after battling lung and brain cancer.

He won praise for his efforts to uphold Catholic identity at Notre Dame, located in his diocese. But he also locked horns with university administration over contentious issues such as the university’s decision to invite President Obama to offer the commencement address and receive an honorary law degree, and the school’s continued approval of the performance on campus of The Vagina Monologues.

In 2009, Bishop D’Arcy boycotted the University’s commencement ceremony due to the president’s pro-abortion policies.

In a statement released by the diocese at the time, D’Arcy said he would not attend the event because “a bishop must teach the Catholic faith ‘in season and out of season,’ and he teaches not only by his words — but by his actions.”

Eighty-three US bishops followed Bishop D’Arcy’s lead in expressing their disapproval of the University of Notre Dame’s invitation to President Obama.

This from ABC News:

D’Arcy received national attention when he was one of the few church officials commended in a scathing 2003 report issued by the Massachusetts attorney general about the widespread sexual abuse of children by priests in the Boston Archdiocese.

D’Arcy also made headlines for opposing some decisions by leaders at the University of Notre Dame, which is in the diocese. He wrote a nine-page “pastoral response” in 2006 criticizing the decision by the Rev. John Jenkins, Notre Dame’s president, to allow “The Vagina Monologues” to be performed on campus.

D’Arcy also boycotted Notre Dame’s commencement in 2009 because of the speaker, President Barack Obama, whose policies on stem cell research and abortion D’Arcy said ran counter to church teaching. But D’Arcy did attend an open-air Mass and rally on the campus that day, saying he wanted to support the students protesting Obama. “All of you are heroes, and I’m proud to stand with you,” he said.

The South Bend Tribune reported:

D’Arcy was also outspoken against child abuse by priests through his lifetime. In 2003, he disclosed that 16 priests in the Fort Wayne-South Bend diocese had abused 33 children since 1950 — actions that ultimately cost the diocese more than $1.36 million in damages, according to a 2010 Tribune article.

D’Arcy said in a 2003 press conference that he decided to publicly announce the numbers because “there has been too much secrecy nationally.”

In fact, it was not the first time D’Arcy spoke up about the abuse — letters from D’Arcy to Catholic bishops as early as 1978 concerning abuse allegations have surfaced. While some have said D’Arcy was sent to Indiana from Boston because of his frankness about the abuse, D’Arcy always remained silent on the subject, according to Tribune articles.

D’Arcy was also one of the loudest voices against the invitation of President Barack Obama to speak and receive an honorary degree at the 2009 commencement ceremony at the University of Notre Dame. He stated he did not support the University giving Obama any honors based on his position on abortion. D’Arcy did not attend the 2009 commencement.

It was not the first time he disagreed with the actions of University President Fr. John Jenkins — a 2006 discussion of the performance of “The Vagina Monologues” on campus left D’Arcy and Jenkins at opposite opinions, though D’Arcy elected to attend the 2006 commencement exercises.

Disagreements with political leaders was not limited to just Obama, either. D’Arcy directed the leadership of St. Joseph High School to withdraw the invitation of then-Gov. Joe Kernan to speak at the 2004 commencement ceremony, citing Kernan’s stance on abortion.

He also didn’t attend the 1992 Notre Dame commencement ceremony because Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, that year’s Laetare Medal recipient, had a pro-choice stance.

Here are excerpts from a National Catholic Register interview with D’arcy entitled, “Bishop John D’Arcy: a Legacy of ‘Tough Love‘:

BOSTON — Ten years ago, Bishop John D’Arcy of the Fort Wayne-South Bend (Ind.) Diocese got an urgent call from lawyers representing the Boston Archdiocese, where he had previously served as an auxiliary bishop from 1975-1985. He learned that The Boston Globe would soon publish the personnel files of the alleged serial predator, Father John Geoghan, and that a plaintiff’s attorney had obtained a 1984 letter he wrote opposing the priest’s assignment to a local parish….

Bishop D’Arcy would emerge as an uncommon hero as the clergy abuse scandal unfolded in the media. While the published personnel files of the Boston Archdiocese exposed a legacy of episcopal negligence, Bishop D’Arcy’s repeated efforts to raise the alarm would lead the National Review Board for the Protection of Children and Young People to describe him as a “voice in the wilderness.”

Asked to discuss the reason why he spoke up when others remained silent, Bishop D’Arcy insisted that he should not be singled out for special credit. Rather, he viewed the 10th anniversary of the Boston crisis as an opportunity to reflect on both the vital role of the Catholic bishop, and the ongoing importance of screening candidates for seminary.

The safeguarding of the Catholic priesthood remains his primary concern, and bishops must act as loving shepherds and prudent gatekeepers for their seminary. They should know every seminarian under their jurisdiction, and ensure solid formation. Standards for admission should be high, despite the vocations crisis.

“It is important to have a healthy and beautiful sense of the priesthood — a shepherd after the heart of Christ.

In 1949, he entered the archdiocesan seminary, and then studied in Rome, receiving his doctorate in spiritual theology in 1968. But he received a shock when he returned to Boston to serve as the spiritual director and professor of spiritual theology at St. John’s Seminary.

“At the time, I was still learning what it means to be a spiritual director. But I soon realized that one of my jobs was to get people out of the seminary — while helping the good men become holy priests,” he recalled.

“We had some who should not have been there. At this time, the Vietnam war was raging, so some men were there for the wrong reasons. I was known by some of the seminarians as ‘D’Arcy the hatchet man.’ I was focused on whether their vocation was authentic.”

He continued to direct the office of spiritual development, organizing retreats and spiritual missions, even after he was made an auxiliary bishop in 1975, and then a regional bishop supervising appointments for 100 parishes in the northern part of the archdiocese. Throughout, he maintained a steady focus on the quality of pastors under his jurisdiction.

“If there was a pastor harming the faith, and if I found out that a parish had poor leadership, I would do my best with the personnel board to make a change. The parish is the heart of the diocese.”

During a time when the impact of clergy sexual abuse was poorly understood or ignored, Bishop D’Arcy also grasped its devastating, long-term consequences — whether victims were coerced or manipulated into accepting the advances of adult predators.

“Young people are open to priests and when assaulted in this way, their souls are often irreparably damaged,” he stated in one of several letters cited in the National Review Board’s 2004 “Report on the Crisis in the Catholic Church in the United States.”

That same report asserted that “Bishop D’Arcy appeared to be a voice in the wilderness, and shortly after he raised troubling questions about a number of priests he was asked to leave Boston and was installed as bishop of the Diocese of South Bend-Fort Wayne [sic].” Bishop D’Arcy rejected this assertion during his interview with the Register.

After he took charge of the diocese, Bishop D’Arcy acted on his understanding of a bishop’s role as a loving, but tough-minded shepherd.

One salutary lesson he absorbed from the abuse crisis was that bishops mistakenly ceded their judgment to others.

“That episcopal human judgment — not infallible, but enlightened by grace — was put aside.”

But those careful policies have been matched with a powerful awareness that a bishop must truly know and care for his seminarians and priests.

“The Greek word episkopein means to oversee. There are different models of management. The danger is keeping your distance from the crucial decisions.”

Sister Anne D’Arcy, for her part, is unsurprised by the attention her brother has received in the wake of the crisis.

“The thing about John is that he is not afraid to do the hard thing. If he feels it’s for the good of the Church, he will speak out,” she said.

BCI asks all readers to pray for the repose of the soul of Bishop D’Arcy. We also pray that we see Cardinal O’Malley and future leadership of the Boston Archdiocese learn from the pastoral leadership principles as Bishop D’Arcy and adopt them:

  • “Bishops must act as loving shepherds and prudent gatekeepers for their seminary”
  • “If there was a pastor harming the faith, and if I found out that a parish had poor leadership, I would do my best with the personnel board to make a change”
  • “Bishops mistakenly ceded their judgment to others”
  • “There are different models of management. The danger is keeping your distance from the crucial decisions.”
  • “The bishop’s role is as a loving, but tough-minded shepherd.”
  • “A bishop must teach the Catholic faith ‘in season and out of season,’ and he teaches not only by his words — but by his actions.”
  • “It is important to have a healthy and beautiful sense of the priesthood — a shepherd after the heart of Christ.”
For the soul of Bishop D’Arcy and the souls of the faithful departed, we pray:
Requiem Aeternam dona eis, Domine, et lux perpetuae luceat eis. Requiescant in pace.
Eternal rest, grant unto them O Lord and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. Amen.
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28 Responses to In Memoriam: Bishop John D’Arcy

  1. Lagan, Alfred A. says:

    I have never commented on your blogs but do feel that your obituary of bishop D’Arcy, while praiseworthy and timely, is not the place for a political dialogue. It is unseemly, and inappropriate.
    Al Lagan

    • Alfred,
      Thank you for your readership of the blog and your comment. We are glad you felt our notice of the passing of Bishop D’Arcy was timely and that he was worthy of praise. What would you have suggested BCI do differently in this blog post? We see him as having been a bright shining star among bishops for his courageous words matched by actions, and felt there were lessons learned from him that other bishops should note, thus we were explicit on that point. Alternatively, we could re-title the post, “Lessons learned from Bishop D’Arcy.” Assuming you have been a reader for a while and are familiar with our general approach and the problems in the Boston Archdiocese, how would you express differently the desire to see these admirable traits in our diocesan leadership?

      • Boston priest says:

        BCI,
        Thank you for this excellent tribute to Bishop D’Arcy. I had the pleasure of knowing him and he was “the real deal.”

        Many priests would like to have a courageous bishop who is not afraid to personally confront problems and tackle them head-on, knows all of the clergy by name and genuinely cares about the Presbyterate and who matches their words with their actions. That was John D’Arcy. That’s not Sean O’Malley. He has never confronted BC over The Vagina Monologues, presided over the Ted Kennedy funeral coronation and spe t more time on his blog fawning over the pomp of the ceremony, music and celebrities and smacking down Catholics who complained than he did teaching people about the purpose of a Catholic funeral. He schmoozes with anti-Catholic politicians and fundraisers and blogs all of the photo opps with them, and fails to match his very public actions with his less public words.

        This archdiocese, or what’s left of it. is desperately in need of strong pastoral leadership. BCI is the only place where this message can be communicated without fear of retaliation. I commend BCI for this post and am glad they recognized John D’Arcy for the outstanding priest, bishop, and shepherd he was.

    • Objective Observer says:

      Perhaps, Mr. Lagan, you could look at this from a different angle — Bishop D’Arcy never broke a sweat when it came to doing the right thing. He just did it. He did not seem to waver, nor to indulge self-doubt, nor fear making the famous unhappy with him. He really thought about things, and when he reacted, one knew the reaction was born of both intelligence and heart, not self-preservation. Some people thought this amounted to folly, but most knew that John D’Arcy was a fool only for Christ.

      My reading of the commentary BCI has included in this tribute is a longing for Bishop D’Arcy’s qualities in Boston’s leadership. This is much in the way one might comment on the passing of any person of substance in any position — to long for the same qualities in those who now hold the post.

      • Objective Observer,
        Indeed, your reading of our commentary is spot-on–it is a heartfelt admiration for Bishop D’Arcy’s qualities and desire to see those same qualities in the leadership here in the Boston Archdiocese. Thank you for taking the words out of our mouth!

        To Mr. Lagan and other readers, BCI is not looking for some mythical figure or superhero. There are other bishops who have these qualities and exercise them naturally as they fulfill their responsibilities as bishop to teach, sanctify and govern. BCI believes it is quite reasonable for us to desire these qualities in the Archbishop of Boston–and in fact, BCI believes they are necessary attributes.

    • Michael says:

      Alfred, … it is you that needs to stop being so political

  2. jbq2 says:

    @Lagan, Alfred: I disagree strenously with your comment. Bishop D’Arcy is “one more star in the night sky”. In terms of a police officer, his watch is now over. Semper Fi.

  3. Anon Catholic says:

    Bishop John D’Arcy is truly a sincere, devout and holy man. Would that more bishops followed his lead.

  4. Ray Neary says:

    Loving and tough-minded. What a beautiful Christ-like tribute. RIP Bishop John D’Arcy

  5. tryingtofigurethisout says:

    BCI, Great post on the good Bishop… I have no idea what A Lagan is talking about so i would ignore him if i were you….If D’arcy was in charge around here now , you can bet the house , this blog probably would not even exist… And if D’arcy was in charge for the last 40 years, you can bet the house the horror that has been done would have been done on a mach smaller scale… One of the most insightful things he said via your post was the story about the seminary during vietnam and the questionable candidates… This Pope has said it repeatedly and implied it even more…. Our church needs to get smaller….Clearly it was grown to fast for the wrong reasons and we have been dealing with the effects of this….evangelize , yes… promote the city of God yes… But my fear with our current Cardinal who i do still think is a good man, is that he Just doesn’t see that this needs to be done without compromise…I was much more inclined to defend our Cardinal when i first started reading this Blog….Sadly, that position has changed …..I am still trying to figure this all out, but i am increasingly moving in the direction that something significant has to change … I will say though that I don’t believe a lot of the problems that are present , not just local fiduciary issues which i know is the main driver of this blog, but also the wider Spiritual issues , are just present here in RCAB… I think there is a commonality among most Diocese in this country regarding a lot of post VAT2 issues….I don’t exactly know what the quick answer is… I know the answer is not, as some who post here think it is , is a complete return to the extraordinary form of the mass….and before the man who loves to hear himself talk Jack O starts in , I attend the Mass once a month in newton… I love it and would go every day if i could… but I do know something has to change.. and my common sense tells me a big part of the change needs to be we need to get smaller, more holy and more faithfull… If this means not being able to stick our fingers in every single aspect of social Justice issues, so be it….

    • Michael says:

      TTFTO said: But my fear with our current Cardinal who i do still think is a good man –

      what is your evidence of this?

  6. Stephen says:

    tryingtofigurethisout,
    Liturgical abuses are the most pressing problem? Ya, pretty much. It is the source and summit of the Faith. The RC church in America is a multi-headed hydra, you’d either have to be employed by it or asleep not to notice. Is the Latin Mass (TLM) the answer? I guess that would depend on the question. I believe it is the answer to several questions;
    How to reestablish true holiness to the Priesthood?
    How do we work toward reverence for the Eucharist in the laity.?
    How best to focus the Mass on God in the form of Bread?
    And finally,
    How do we build continuity in the Faithful and rebuild true community? This, the paradox of The Latin Mass!
    1) All in attendance on the same page, or at least trying to follow!
    2) All marvel at the quiet, and mystery.
    3) After Mass and the work of the Alter is complete, hang out, eat a donut, build community. simple.

    Will the Latin Mass solve the salary problem in Braintree?
    I believe the short answer is yes.
    The ‘church professional’ tyranny that The Consecrated Priests must deal with on a daily basis is an assault on The Faith and a boat load of crap, docked in Braintree. Sean is the Captain.

    TLM would set the tone with all the clergy and lay professionals and return order to God’s earthly vessel The Church.

    – “I work for God full-time, you work for me.”

    Vatican 2 gave away the dignity of the faith in an effort to make friends. It never works. (I suspect that is what is in Jack O’ drink)

    The Priests of the Diocese should take note; People who actually understand what is going on around here will give you a kidney for the asking, if you’d offer TLM, just once every Sunday. Don’t ask, just do it. Be Extraordinary!

    Personally, I do attend both forms of the Mass. If TLM were offered at my local parish it is the Mass I would exclusively assist.

  7. Another Stephen says:

    Another Stephen says
    i’ve been reading this blog for a while and notice that only people who agree with your viewpoint get any notice. I grew up with the Latin mass and truly loved it ,particularly the sung version and can still remember most of the prayers in Latin. I attended a Latin mass recently and found that I was not very involved. I missed the communal aspect that the present form in the vernacular provides. I found that my attention was more present in the new form. So I guess this is one Catholic who doesn’t think that the Latin Mass is the solution to every problem that exists in the church today

    • Another Stephen, Thank you for your readership and comment. BCI believes there are a number of problems in the Catholic Church that need to be solved. Our 400 blog posts since June of 2010 reflect the scope of local Boston problems. While we also very much appreciate the beauty of the Latin Mass, we do not believe that alone is the solution to every problem in the Catholic Church today.

      For the sake of maintaining focus on the topic of this blog post, namely a tribute to the late Bishop D’Arcy, we would ask readers to keep their comments focused on Bishop D’Arcy and the attributes that led us to admire his episcopal leadership.

    • Stephen says:

      Christ clearly seen in TLM is the solution, sin is the problem.
      Will it solve all the problems? I believe, and I think it is in union with church teaching that all solutions will flow from Christ Truly present.

  8. Jack Shaughnessy says:

    Thanks for a beautiful tribute to Bishop D’arcy. He is a graduate, class of 1949, from that great Jesuit school, Boston College High School as also was the late great Richard Cardinal Cushing. When Bishop D’arcy graduated from B. C. H., about 12% of all graduates went directly to the seminary.I am impressed with your extraordinarily insightful views of the Archdiocese of Boston. You are not the voice of one crying in the wilderness. Jack S

    • Michael says:

      I think when Bishop Darcy was at BCH, they probably did not have a muslim prayer room as they do today? Am I correct? COuld BCI do a fact check on this? Maybe a quick call to BCH to confirm?

      • Michael, BCI believes you are correct–that there was probably not a Muslim prayer room at BC High when Bishop D’Arcy was a student there. We appreciate tips, but unfortunately, we will not have time to verify the existence of a Muslim prayer room at BC High in the near-term. If another reader would like to drop a dime to investigate that further, we would certainly be open to whatever is learned and verified.

    • Jack,
      Thank you for your kind words about this tribute to Bishop D’Arcy and for the positive feedback on our views of the Boston Archdiocese. It does sometimes feel like we are lone voices crying out in the wilderness, and it is gratifying to know we are not alone and are in very good company! Thank YOU for all of the good works you have done for the archdiocese over the years and continue to do for the Catholic Church.

  9. Nicholas J Spring says:

    RE: Mr Lagan’s parting shot — I could not disagree more. Somebody has to continue the unfortunate failings of Cardinal O’Malley, not only destroying the financial character of his archdiocese but in the direct dialogue to all parishioners on his poor administration of the arcdiocese. It is not political but is trying to follow the teachings and direct leadership needed by and for the RCAB.

  10. Jack O'Malley says:

    Rosaries for the repose of the soul of Bishop D’Arcy. He was a Herculean defender of the Faith. He’d have cleaned out the Augean stables of the Boston chancery. He did his utmost to thwart the non-Catholic influence of “Notre Dame”. He is an archetype of the faithful and magisterial episcopacy.

    Obiter dictum, I for one am not “trying to figure this out”. It is not hard to understand for anyone with a semblance of a cerebral cortex. Those who haven’t the mental capacity to “figure this out” might be better advised to work on their typographical, orthographical, punctuational, grammatical and stylistic deficiencies and avoid the superfluous deprecatory allusions to other commenters and the self-laudatory atta-boys for attendance in “newton”.

    BTW, I cannot agree that the occasional or even frequent use of the Ratzinger-nuncupated “extraordinary form” would result in a restoration of the Faith. However, its universal and exclusive use, especially by Papa Ratzinger, would certainly do so in that it would drive out the V2 crop of protestant suck-ups. Satis dictum.

  11. tyringtofigurethisout says:

    George Weigle was on EWTN the other night….he disagrees with your assessment ….watch the replay of the world over if you want more clarification….you seem dangerously close to being aligned with the SSPX which has NO canonical status within the Catholic Church… By the way Jack, do you think it is a good thing that i can explain to my small children exactly what is going on during mass in the language that they speak?…do you think it is a good thing that my 2 year old can actually repeat the language of many parts of the mass and in his mind understand what is going on?…and none of this is done with the help of any clown masses or puppet shows before you go down that road….I take offense to your subtle , but yet readily apparent shots at the pope… BCI , the blog is not going to be taken seriously if you continue to provide a forum for guys like this …..You do good work.. but when you give guys like this a forum to attack the church, you’ve lost me…i ll still read it,… but no more postings until you clean up some of the borderline heretics

  12. Stephen says:

    Lighten up Clarence,
    Jack O’Malley and George Weigle share identical canonical status.
    EWTN has not been the same since Mother Angelica has been out of the picture. I believe the USCCB now owns it, you know the USCCB? the group of Bishops with NO formal ecclesial standing, that was NONE, ZERO.

    You said your grew up with the Latin Mass. That would put you at 50 years of age or older, and the reason you can’t explain the Latin Mass to your kids as your parents did for you is what?

    As Catholics we are not required to be in any particular Popes Fan club. We are required to follow dogmatic teaching. I have not found any in the door stop, called Theology of the Body or in most the pastoral documents of Vatican 2, of which our current Pope played a pivotal role.

    In case you missed it, we are in the midst of the reform of the reform.

    Dangerously close to being aligned with the SSPX?
    Dangerously?
    Is there any doubt that SSPX alone are responsible for preserving what Benedict XVI has labelled the Extraordinary form?

    I just wish you baby boomers would start to read about the faith and stop watching EWTN and considering yourself experts on the new church paradigm. There is no new church paradigm, there is only truth and error. TLM is the sacramental solution.

    • Folks, This post is about the legacy of Bishop D’Arcy. Period. If necessary we will start removing comments that are off that topic BCI respects and follows the Magisterium, and this blog is not a place for discussion of groups that are not canonically recognized.

      Those who are mostly focused on TLM and feel you have to continually suggest that as the one solution to all Boston problems are advised to start your own Boston TLM blog.

    • tyringtofigurethisout says:

      FIRST, ID LIKE YOU TO SHOW ME WHERE EXACTLY I SAID I GREW UP WITH THE LATIN MASS…. second, i’m 34 years old and a graduate of Franciscan U Steubenville where the extraordinary form of the mass is offered at least once every day…. You show your ignorance with your clueless comments….third, of course you are part of the group who says EWTN has lost their way… that’s exactly what the apologists of the SSPX say….you can ramble on all you want want but the fact is the SSPX has no canonical status in the in Roman Catholic Church….they have the same status as the American Catholic Church or any other of the break away groups on the left or on the right who claim to be authentically Catholic…. What are you ? God have mercy on your soul….

      • tyringtofigurethisout says:

        and another thing you incredible spreader of misinformation.. EWTN is owned by the USCCB?….. what planet are you living on my friend…and if you listen to the interview with Weigle you will see he has nothing at all in common with you or jack O

  13. All,
    Apparently, some aspect of “keep your comments relevant to the topic of the blog post” is not clear to a few readers. As such, we are closing comments on this post.

    The post began by saying:

    “Bishop Emeritus of South Bend Indiana and former Boston auxiliary bishop John D’Arcy passed into eternal rest on Sunday morning. BCI was saddened to hear of his passing and we pray for the repose of his soul.

    This blog post could have also been titled, “What Cardinal O’Malley and all bishops can learn from Bishop John D’Arcy.” For those not familiar to him, we offer a few excerpts from articles as a tribute to his pastoral leadership–in both the sexual abuse crisis but also defense of the faith at Notre Dame and in the public square.

    The post ended by saying:

    BCI asks all readers to pray for the repose of the soul of Bishop D’Arcy. We also pray that we see Cardinal O’Malley and future leadership of the Boston Archdiocese learn from the pastoral leadership principles as Bishop D’Arcy and adopt them:

    “Bishops must act as loving shepherds and prudent gatekeepers for their seminary”
    “If there was a pastor harming the faith, and if I found out that a parish had poor leadership, I would do my best with the personnel board to make a change”
    “Bishops mistakenly ceded their judgment to others”
    “There are different models of management. The danger is keeping your distance from the crucial decisions.”
    “The bishop’s role is as a loving, but tough-minded shepherd.”
    “A bishop must teach the Catholic faith ‘in season and out of season,’ and he teaches not only by his words — but by his actions.”
    “It is important to have a healthy and beautiful sense of the priesthood — a shepherd after the heart of Christ.”

    For the soul of Bishop D’Arcy and the souls of the faithful departed, we pray:
    Requiem Aeternam dona eis, Domine, et lux perpetuae luceat eis. Requiescant in pace.
    Eternal rest, grant unto them O Lord and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. Amen.

    That is the last word on this topic. Comments on this post are now being closed. Please do not try to continue discussion of this topic on another thread here, otherwise your comments will be moderated.

  14. [...] Bishop of Boston, Bishop of Ft. Wayne, Indiana, or Bishop of Rome, we extend the words of the late Bishop John D’Arcy to offer that the bishop’s role is as a loving, but tough-minded shepherd–a shepherd after [...]

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