Happy New Year 2013

BCI wishes all a very happy and healthy new year.

Once again this year, we thought both the first reading and psalm for today would make for a nice way to kick off 2013. As we celebrate the Octave Day of the Nativity of the Lord and the Solemnity of Mary, the Holy Mother of God, the psalm is: “May God bless us in his mercy.” (Psalm 67).

Here is a beautiful 2-minute musical version of the psalm, entitled, “The Lord Bless You and Keep You” by British composer, John Rutter.

(In case you cannot play the embedded video, here is a link to it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PO17DIeI7Ec )

Our prayer for you in 2013 is that same hope so beautifully expressed in the song–that the Lord bless and keep you, that His Face shine upon you and be gracious, and give you peace.

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12 Responses to Happy New Year 2013

  1. Ginny K. Allen says:

    It appears that MANY parishes neglected to inform their flock that today is a Holyday of OBLIGATION. How can we help to get this changed for the better next Holyday?

    • Catholic Teacher Man says:

      What is worse is that many parishes had one Mass today (the 4 in my “collaborative” had 5 total, most at 8 or 9 this morning.) Seems like many priests forgot that it was a Holy Day.

      • Anni says:

        My parish had one Mass, at 9 am, and it was scheduled in the “lower church”, which holds around 150 people! It was full, but the message was clear. The pastor wasn’t even there. It’s his day off! A 90-year-old Jesuit from Campion said the Mass, assisted by the Deacon. After Mass I met a woman from a neighboring parish in the parking lot, and she said her parish scheduled only one Mass, at 11 am, as well. It seems that our pastors are telling us that Holy Days of Obligation are an anachronism and we don’t have to attend Mass. My parish had only one Mass on the Immaculate Conception. I wonder if this is a sign of things to come.

    • ParishPal says:

      Ginny,

      How would you increase attendance?

      • Ginny K. Allen says:

        I have contacted someone in the office of lifelong learning in Portland, ME where I am located and suggested that there be something put out to all parishes as a way to remind first the priests and then the faithful of the importance of Holydays of Obligation. Part of me thinks that this may not be unintentional because if the parishioner is not aware of the severity of missing Mass he/she is not accountable. This would cause me to believe that there is then much accountability in the hands and hearts of some of out clergy. I am a big one for speaking out loudly and clearly of the objective reality of mortal sin. Many in my parish didn’t even know of mortal sin until an elderly priest spoke about it at several masses a couple of years ago. Most had been taught a form of the fundamental option. How SAD!!! I want as many as possible to come to the full truth and get to heaven.

      • ParishPal says:

        Ginny,

        Perhaps one reason many of the parishoners
        present and value the faith is that those in their 60′s are somewhat literate in history.

        “Educated” people in their 30′s, 40′s, &
        50′s did not learn history, they learned
        Social Studies—-Yikes!!

        What about thinking outside the box?

        Remember the HBO series, ROME?
        Remember Marc Antony–everyones type?

        Anyway, is this is how people treated each other before Christianity? If so, why not point it out? Make the connection.

    • David S. says:

      Hi Ginny,

      I think parishes did in fact inform their parishioners that January 1 is a Holyday of Obligation. My guess is during the Masses on Sunday December 30 the majority, if not all, of the priests within the Archdiocese of Boston mentioned it during their announcements. And I suspect most Church bulletins that weekend identified the Holy Day of Obligation as well.

      The problem is the priests no longer tell their parishioners that failure to attend Mass on a Holy Day of Obligation (without a good excuse) is a mortal sin. In fact, when was the last time you heard mortal sin from the pulpit?

      David

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  3. Our parish priest came up with the best slogan for the new year! “Oh what the heck, come on in!” We’re spreading the word.

  4. Ginny K. Allen says:

    I no longer live in the Boston Diocese but when Monsignor Rossiter was my pastor he was fantastic. This would never have happened.

  5. Anni says:

    I checked out online bulletins for all parishes in my area regarding Masses on the Solemnity of Mary, the Holy Mother of God. It is very interesting…

    Immaculate Conception, Marlborough – the Vicar Forane’s parish
    Mass at 4 pm, 8 am, 10 am

    St. Michael, Hudson – Mass in English at 7 pm and 9 am; Mass in Portuguese at 7 pm on Jan. 1

    St. Julia, Weston – Mass at 4 pm and 11:15 am in Weston and at 9 am at St. Joseph, Lincoln

    St. Irene – Carlisle – Mass at 5 pm, 8 am, 11 am

    And now the one-Mass parishes…

    St. Bridget, Maynard – 9 am
    Holy Family, Concord – 11 am
    Our Lady of Fatima, Sudbury – 9 am
    St. Matthias, Marlborough – 10 am

    St. Elizabeth, Acton – 9:15 am
    St. Isidore, Stow – 10:30 am

    To be fair to these two parishes, they share one pastor and one parochial vicar, so it appears that each priest said one Mass

    St. Anselm, Sudbury had one Mass, at 4 pm on the Vigil; this is a very small parish, and has only two Masses on the weekends

    The other parishes that scheduled only one Mass all have four Masses on the weekends, so having just one Mass on a Holy Day of Obligation is telling people “this is no different than any other day when we have one daily Mass in this parish”. On Holy Days that do not occur on “holidays”, a lot of people may attend Mass at parishes near their place of employment, but on “New Year’s Day” just about everyone is home and “should” attend Mass in his or her parish. Some parishes and pastors “get it”, but many do not.

    A good place to start “the New Evangelization” is by preaching on the value of the Mass and its place in our lives. Maybe Bishop Kennedy should start evangelizing his priests so that the message can trickle down to the people.

    There were around 160 of us at the Holy Day Mass at my parish. The average age was around 60. Other than the altar servers and a few babes in arms, there were no children. There were no teenagers there. The message is clearly not getting out in the religious ed program. It’s not getting out to a whole generation in between.

    • Michael says:

      I thought the “new evangelization” was about building a cool Christian rock band and acting as their manager/spiritual director? You know … bringing Christ down to their level instead of us up to His.

      That reminds me. Does anyone onow why the Pilot publishing company DOES NOT CAPITALIZE “His” when it refers to God the Father or Jesus? Why the lower case in the Mass laity response card (cheat sheet – not sure of it’s actual name) that exists in every pew?

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